Savannah's Paw Tracks

Autobiography of a Former Shelter Cat

Archive for the category “Community Cats”

Snipping a Budding Cat Colony: Part One

HIYA!!   SAVANNAH HERE!!!

I told you on my last blog post that I had a Monday Meowsie News story coming about Katie the Cat who is looking for her permanent home.

Hi! I am Katie the Cat

Truth be known, Katie was actually the beginning of what could have become a fast-growing community cat colony. But, thanks to Dad P’s quick thinking and Community Concern 4 Cats fast acting, that colony is no longer gonna happen.

I do like my inside and outside opportunities. A gal needs her fresh air

Thankfully, Katie’s original family had the good sense to have her spayed before they moved away and left her to fend for herself. Lucky for Katie she found some really kind and caring humans who offered her food and a safe, dry and warm place to live in their garden. She prefers to be able to come and go as she pleases, but I suspect if she were an only kitty, she would simply adore being with her forever human most.  Just my feline opinion, ya know?

Now about the cat colony that almost was! You see because Katie was being fed outside, another couple of young kitties showed up to dine with her. They were a young brother and sister from a litter the humans knew had been born in someone else’s yard. Neither had been spayed or neutered so you can guess what happened, right? (do be sure to hover over the photos to view the captions to learn who is who)

Yep! Piper and her brother mated. This incest mating caused Piper to deliver six kittens in her caretakers’ bedroom closet! Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, three of those kittens were so malformed, without limbs or overly large and whatnot, that they were stillborn. Three kittens survived.

Piper is a great Mom Cat and the human caretakers made sure she and the kittens got lots of food and water and dry safe places to sleep outside. Piper even enjoys being inside and lounging on her male human’s lap!

Long story short—enter Dad P going around our town home complex to let our new neighbors know he was running for our Home Owners Association, Board of Directors.

He met the kitties’ caretakers and noticed all the cats and asked “are these your cats?”. The answer was—“well, not really. We just started feeding them.”

And there was the budding cat colony! So Dad P let Mom L know where the cats were and they both went to talk with the caretakers to learn what we could do to help.

Bottom line is—in less than ten days, Mom L had Mom Cat Piper and her four kittens, all four months old, set up with appointments at CC4C’s new Cat Clinic for spay/neuter, Vet checks, vaccinations, FeLV testing (negative all)!! (more about this wondrous new clinic in another post…don’t miss it!).

Sweet Jessie also had a hernia and CC4C took care of that as well.

Now about darling Katie. Mom L and her caretaker Miss Tonya took Katie to the clinic for a checkup and vaccinations and testing for FeLV when they went to collect all the spay/neuters.  Katie is now all set to go up for adoption too!

Can you see my opposite orange and black furs?

All cats are now recovered and ready for adoption!!

Please, please SHARE SHARE SHARE this blog post to help all of these now “NOT a budding cat colony” cats find their permanent loving homes?

Last but never least! Check back for Part Two of “Snipping a Budding Cat Colony” on my Monday, October 9 blog post. Learn what was the REAL driver to helping this “almost a cat colony” start.

PAW PATS, SAVANNAH

Here a SNIP, There a SNIP, Everywhere a SNIP SNIP!

HIYA!!   SAVANNAH HERE!!!

If you and your community are not gettin’ it goin’ with some SNIP SNIP, then you might want to have a look at this post. Anyone new to my bloggy may not know about how proud I am of my Mom L and Dad P for their volunteering four times a year for our county’s SNIP CLINIC—Spay, Neuter Impact Program. This is an all volunteer clinic, including DVMs (vet docs) RVTs (licensed vet techs), full catered food service by many of our volunteers who also take up stations during the clinic. Our county animal services department allows SNIP to utilize parts of their shelter including the surgery, on four Sundays a year when the shelter is closed. SNIP brings in all its own medical supplies and some medical equipment as well as supplies for the bathrooms and such! All done through generous donations from these very same volunteers and others in our county. Oh and did I mention that most of the DVMs and RVTs come from outside our county, from all parts of the San Francisco Bay Area?

This spay/neuter clinic is exclusive for community cats brought in by either private citizens or cat rescue groups who do TNR (trap, neuter, return). The cost of spay/neuter is $15USD and all the cats get a good physical check up while they are sedated, including but not limited to: vaccinations, wound cleaning, mani/pedi if needed for health, ear mite treatment, flea treatment, antibiotics if the cat has an infected wound, pain medication to help them recover. All cats are recovered to a fully awake status onsite at the clinic and then their caretakers pick them up and take them back for complete recovery at their homes before returning them back to their community homes or cat colonies.

The cats and their caretakers/transporters arrive and present themselves to one of two admission stations. They all have reservations so SNIP can plan ahead for staffing and supplies, etc. Mom L does the admission for the cat rescue groups. They check in with their cats in traps waiting to be processed.

Each cat trap, with cat inside, is lifted onto the admission check in table where one person identifies the cats color/breed and the other person writes it down on the cat’s “toe tag” which will remain attached to the cat’s trap, or the cat itself once sedated. The trap is tagged with a number, the cat’s trap cover has the same number attached and that “toe tag” is never separated from any cat during the whole process. This enables SNIP to ensure that each cat is returned to its very own trap after surgery and then returned to its caretaker.

Oh hey, did I tell you about what happens to the cat’s trap while they are prepped for surgery and then go through surgery??? That trap gets all cleaned up! The cats are returned to sanitized traps, with fresh paper for them to recover. They are also placed on warmers after surgery to ensure they don’t get cold. Not bad, right?

Dad P serves in the morning as an Admit Transporter meaning he transports the newly admitted cat to the area where it will receive its sedation injection.

The male cats don’t take much time for these experienced Vets to neuter them—like maybe 3-5 minutes!! So most of the vets spend their time in the surgery doing female cat spays. This past SNIP Clinic saw approximately eighty four cats come through and many of the females were already pregnant. So begins my county’s “kitten season”. When kittens are aborted the community cat population can be actively diminished by literally hundreds of cats. An average cat has 1-8 kittens per litter and 2-3 litters per year. During her productive life, one female cat could have more than 100 kittens. A single pair of cats and their kittens can produce as many as 420,000 kittens in just 7 years. Now you do the math and figure how many cats will be added to a community cat population if one female is allowed to birth her kittens and then all her kittens, not neutered and not spayed , start to reproduce within six months or less from their own birth.

So many of the community cats Mom L and Dad P see every SNIP Clinic are beautiful cats. So unfortunate they did not have the care they deserved early in life such as spay/neuter and proper vaccinations.

Let me introduce you to some of the cats Mom L was able to capture during the April 2017 SNIP Clinic. You can read the captions I added if you simply hover your “mousie” over each photo. Hope you enjoy my added captions.

This last clinic saw a large number of Siamese.

One sweet, not completely feral, ladycat caught Mom L’s eye.

So many community cats, so few humans who care enough to simply ask for the resources that are available in communities across the USA—many low cost or now cost—

SPAY/NEUTER ALL YOUR COMPANION ANIMALS

KEEP THEM SAFE AND STOP THE OVER POPULATION OF UNWANTED COMPANION ANIMALS

PURRLEASE DO NOT LEAVE WITHOUT VIEWING THIS SLIDESHOW

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

PAW PATS, SAVANNAH

Update: Kauai Community Cats Need Our Help

HIYA!  SAVANNAH HERE!!

I am back again with an important update about the struggle of the Kauai Community Cat Project (KCCP) and the Kauai island county government. I have to warn you that I kind’a have my neck furs all standing up ‘cuz I am in a bit of a snit over what’s going on in secrecy in Kauai.

I was once a stray—this could have been my fate!

I was once a stray—this could have been my fate!

In August I let you know about a potential ban being placed on all TNR (trap, neuter, return) efforts on the whole five hundred and fifty plus square miles of land on Kauai. You can read all about it here.

Yep, you got that right! This county council committee, the Feral Cat Ordinance Committee, is working hard, and in secret, to craft strategies which will map the whole island and declare it as “sensitive bird habitat”. The WHOLE island my pals, which leaves nowhere for community cat colonies to be managed and decreased over time through TNR.

Community cats

Here is the latest update we received just late last week from Mr. Basil Scott, President of KCCP.

IMPORTANT UPDATE: From Kauai Community Cat Project
Sunshine Law Complaint Filed To Prevent County From Enacting Ordinance Resulting From Closed-Door Meetings!

 “On September 20, 2016, Kauai Community Cat Project (KCCP) filed a Sunshine Law complaint to prevent the County from enacting an ordinance resulting from years of closed-door meetings. Council member Yukimura, who helped to define this process and has personally led it for the last year-and-a-half, has publicly defended the County’s closed-door approach.

 Now here is the big deal that pushed KCCP to file a complaint against the county council’s Feral Cat Ordinance Committee. The state of Hawaii has what is called a “Sunshine Law”. The Sunshine Law is Hawaii’s open meetings law. It governs the manner in which all state and county boards must conduct their official business.

§92-1 Declaration of policy and intent. In a democracy, the people are vested with the ultimate decision-making power. Governmental agencies exist to aid the people in the formation and conduct of public policy. Opening up the governmental processes to public scrutiny and participation is the only viable and reasonable method of protecting the public’s interest. Therefore, the legislature declares that it is the policy of this State that the formation and conduct of public policy – the discussions, deliberations, decisions, and action of governmental agencies – shall be conducted as openly as possible.

I am asking all my readers who support TNR as the ONLY strategy for humane management of community cat over population to let your voices be heard. The community cats on the island of Kauai don’t have voices.

Voiceless

Voiceless

Those rescue groups who have been their advocates have been held out of meetings where the well being of this cat population is being determined.

Please, send emails to every committee member, especially the chair, Council member Joann Yukimura, asking them to behave democratically and openly.

live-in-harmony

Here are the names and email addresses for all members who are allowed to be active on the Feral Cat Ordinance Committee:

 Feral Cat Ordinance Committee Members
Joann Yukimura jyukimura@kauai.gov
Penny Cistaro Cistaro@kauaihumane.org
Cali Crampton cali@kauaiforestbirds.org
Adam Griesemer adam_griesemer@fws.gov
Makaala Kaaumoana makaala@hawaiian.net
Bill Lucey kiscmgr@hawaii.edu
Hob Osterlund info@albatrosskauai.org
Brooke McFarland brooke.a.mcfarland@hawaii.gov
Andre Raine araine6@hawaii.edu
William Trugillo wtrugillo@kauai.gov

Mom L asked Brian’s Dad Mr. Terry to place a copy of Mom L’s own email on their server. Please feel free to take a look and use any portion of it that helps you send off your own email.

Letter to Kauai Committee

Further information:

A MUST READ! If you do not paw any other link in this blog post, paw this one! Kauai Endangered Sea Bird Recovery Project confirms: cats are NOT the greatest threat!
Most Important Causes of Threat to Kauai Bird Population

Hawaii’s Sunshine Law

Donate to Kauai Community Cat Project

Kauai County Restrictions February 2016

PAW PATS, SAVANNAH

UPDATE ON MOMMA KAT COMING SOON! She is still #mommakatssearch hoping for her forever home. Check out her new photo

Momma Kat poses

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